Assignment Help For You!

Special Offer! Get 20-30% Off on Every Order!

Posted: September 4th, 2023

NURS 5163 – Comprehensive Care of the Older Person

NURS 5163 – Comprehensive Care of the Older Person

Assessment 3 – Portfolio

Your Name & Student Number

Table of Contents

1. Learning Activity 5 – Ageing Population 2
2. Learning Activity 19 – Policies & Guidelines 3
3. Learning Activity 22 – Recommendations from the Royal Commission 4
4. Learning Activity 23 – Physical Assessment 5
5. Learning Activity 27 – Spiritual Assessment 6
6. Learning Activity 33 – Health education & Health promotion 7
7. Learning Activity 34 – Quality use of Medicine 8
8. Learning Activity 35 – Best Practice- Reflection 9
9. References 10

1. Learning Activity 5 – Ageing Population
1. Do you believe that an increasingly ageing population poses a serious threat to the Australian government’s capacity to provide health and social care services to older Australians? If so, why? If not, why not?

2. What steps do you believe need to be taken in order plan for the future provision of health and social care to older Australians and their families?

3. In what ways do you think the health care system needs to change in order to better meet the needs of older Australians in the future?

4. How do you think population ageing will influence the roles and responsibilities of health professionals?

2. Learning Activity 19 – Policies & Guidelines
High-level strategic policies give effect to the visions and directions of the government and guide the whole direction and culture of the department or the portfolio. Policies inform staff of their working arrangements in terms of process, content, attitude, priority and urgency.
To assist in answering the following questions review the SA Health Policies and guidelines
1. Please review the title of each policy and identify which ones are specifically related to the older person and make a note of your findings.

2. After you have identified the policies that are applicable to caring for the older person which ones are you not familiar with? Identify those policies and list 3 key messages that are related to that policy.

3. In your opinion are there any policies or directives that are missing in the care of the older person, what are they and why do you think they are needed?

4. If you could change ONE thing about our health care system regarding caring for the older person, what would that be? And how could it be implemented?

3. Learning Activity 22 – Recommendations from the Royal Commission

This topic will examine: Reform agendas in aged care
Learning objectives
At the completion of this topic you should be able to:
1. Critically discuss key reforms that have occurred in caring for older people and aged care services in Australia.
2. Be aware of the recommendations that have been made from the Royal Commission in Aged Care Quality & Safety and how this will influence reform in the way we care for our older persons in Australia.

4. Learning Activity 23 – Physical Assessment

Bob Tomlinson sustained a hip fracture from a fall as he was taking his rubbish bin out.
After surgery, he is admitted to a surgical ward for recovery.
He is 90 years old and lives alone since his wife’s death three years ago.
He has a son who lives in Australia, with whom he seems to have little contact.
Mr Tomlinson desperately wants to go home.
He often talks about his 10-year-old Labrador, who is being looked after by neighbours.
He has started walking with a frame but has developed continence problems and it is likely that he will require support with activities of daily living after discharge.
You are one of the health care professionals looking after Mr Tomlinson on the ward and have been tasked with writing a care plan for him.
1. Which questions would you ask Mr Tomlinson regarding his physical health?
2. Which tools, tests or screening would you use to assess the physical domain?
3. What other domains of health need to be assessed to ensure holistic care?
4. How do Mr Tomlinson’s physical issues affect the other domains of health?
5. Which health professionals need to be involved in Mr Tomlinson’s care?
(Wiltjer & Kendall 2019a, p. 44)

5. Learning Activity 27 – Spiritual Assessment
Take a moment to reflect on practice – your own and/or that of other members of staff – to identify whether the spiritual needs of older people are met in your workplace. Consider the following questions:
1. How well is spiritual care assessed in your workplace?
2. What barriers prevent you or your colleagues from assessing the spiritual needs of the older people under your care?
3. What could be done to improve the assessment and evaluation process in terms of spiritual care provision?
(Wiltjer & Kendall 2019e, p27)

6. Learning Activity 33 – Health education & Health promotion
• Jeffery is a 76 years of age and lives in an outer Adelaide Southern suburb .

• He owns his own house and lives alone following the death of his wife 18 months ago.

• He has two dogs that are always with him.
• Jeffery is quite active and regularly walks for 10 kms three times a week.

• He states that he doesn’t seem to get lonely as he often catches up with people on his walks. He also swims at the local heated pool at least twice a week.
• His family is settled in other areas of the state and they usually visit each other monthly and ring each other regularly on the phone.

• Jeffery states that he has had increasing vertigo and intermittent hearing loss that he describes as annoying especially when he is ‘on the phone.’

• he had recently had a bout of gastroenteritis which made him quite dehydrated and he required a short stay in the local hospital.

• Jefefry keeps mentally active by reading, completing, crosswords, brain games and using the Internet.
• At time he is concerned that he is getting dementia as he forgets things easily.

• The GP is concerned that there is a degree of dementia and wants to send Jeffery for more tests.

• This is frightening for him as he has always been mentally active and managed a large business until his retirement at 70.

• Jeffery believes that he has excellent health and does not take any medication.
1. Please discuss: The interventions that will be applied in this situation (from a Health education & Health promotion perspective) that will help manage, improve, and maintain Jeffery’s health.

7. Learning Activity 34 – Quality use of Medicine

Please review the following resources on:
1. Medications & Older Adults
2. Medications and Adverse Outcomes in Older Adults
Once you have reviewed these resources you will be in a good position to undertake the following case study:

Mrs AB is 95 years old and has a past medical history of osteoporosis, ischaemic heart disease and atrialfibrillation. She has spent the last couple of years in a care home. Her current medication is

1. aspirin 300mg daily,
2. bisoprolol 2.5mg daily,

3. alendronate 70mg weekly,

4. AdcalD3 1tablet twice daily,
5. simvastatin 40 mg at night

6. and paracetamol 1g four times daily.
Questions:
1. Please rationalise Mrs AB’s medications
2. What are some of the barriers to implementing strategies to limit the potential harms due to polypharmacy?
3. Provide some strategies that you could use in your role as a health care professional to overcome the barriers that you identified?

8. Learning Activity 35 – Best Practice- Reflection

Leaders play an essential role in the health care of older adults. Please read the following article: Senior manager leadership competencies for quality residential aged care: an Australian industry perspective, Do you agree with the authors findings that The differences of views of leaders’ role and competence, and especially the increased focus on personal characteristics may have an impact on the health care provided to older adults?Please justify your response.

9. References

Learning Activities High Distinction 85% + Distinction 75-84% Credit 65-74% P1 55-64% P2 50-54% F1 40-49% F2
0-39%
Learning Activity Five (5) – Week Two (2)

Ageing population (250 words)
5 Marks As for D plus stimulates new thoughts/perspective s on the topic in response to the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Excellent level of critical analysis Comprehensively answers all the questions posed in Learning Activity. Responses are conveyed clearly, succinctly & concisely.
Very good level of critical analysis. Clearly answers all the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Responses are synthesised & non- repetitive in manner.
Evidence of critical analysis. Adequately answers most of the questions posed in the Learning Activity.
Some evidence of critical analysis. Information is not clearly presented in response to the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Responses are mostly descriptive with limited evidence of critical analysis. Minimal attempt to answer the questions Posed in the Learning Activity Responses are simplistic with limited to no evidence of critical analysis. incorrect and unstructured or absent response to most of the questions posed in the Learning Activity
No evidence of critical analysis

Learning Activity Nineteen(19) – Week Four (4)

Policies & Guidelines

(500 words)

10 Marks As for D plus stimulates new thoughts/perspective s on the topic in response to the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Excellent level of critical analysis Comprehensively answers all the questions posed in Learning Activity. Responses are conveyed clearly, succinctly & concisely.
Very good level of critical analysis. Clearly answers all the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Responses are synthesised & non- repetitive in manner.
Evidence of critical analysis. Adequately answers most of the questions posed in the Learning Activity.
Some evidence of critical analysis. Information is not clearly presented in response to the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Responses are mostly descriptive with limited evidence of critical analysis. Minimal attempt to answer the questions Posed in the Learning Activity Responses are simplistic with limited to no evidence of critical analysis. incorrect and unstructured or absent response to most of the questions posed in the Learning Activity
No evidence of critical analysis

Learning Activity Twenty Two (22) – Week Five (5)
Future Needs (500 words)
10 Marks As for D plus stimulates new thoughts/perspective s on the topic in response to the questions posed in the Learning Activity.
Excellent level of Comprehensively answers all the questions posed in Learning Activity. Responses are conveyed clearly, succinctly &
concisely. Clearly answers all the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Responses are synthesised & non- repetitive in manner.
Evidence of critical Adequately answers most of the questions posed in the Learning Activity.
Some evidence of critical analysis. Information is not clearly presented in response to the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Responses are mostly descriptive
with limited evidence Minimal attempt to answer the questions Posed in the Learning Activity Responses are simplistic with limited to no evidence of
critical analysis. incorrect and unstructured or absent response to most of the questions posed in the Learning Activity
No evidence of critical analysis

Learning Activities High Distinction 85% + Distinction 75-84% Credit 65-74% P1 55-64% P2 50-54% F1 40-49% F2
0-39%
critical analysis Very good level of
critical analysis. analysis. of critical analysis.

Learning Activity Twenty Three (23) – Week Seven (7)

Physical Assessment & Evaluation

(500 words)
10 Marks As for D plus stimulates new thoughts/perspective s on the topic in response to the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Excellent level of critical analysis Comprehensively answers all the questions posed in Learning Activity. Responses are conveyed clearly, succinctly & concisely.
Very good level of critical analysis. Clearly answers all the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Responses are synthesised & non- repetitive in manner.
Evidence of critical analysis. Adequately answers most of the questions posed in the Learning Activity.
Some evidence of critical analysis. Information is not clearly presented in response to the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Responses are mostly descriptive with limited evidence of critical
analysis. Minimal attempt to answer the questions Posed in the Learning Activity Responses are simplistic with limited to no evidence of critical analysis. incorrect and unstructured or absent response to most of the questions posed in the Learning Activity
No evidence of critical analysis

Learning Activity Twenty Seven (27)
– Week Seven (7)

Spiritual Assessment & Evaluation – Reflection
10 Marks The reflection is thoughtful & exceptionally well organised. It clearly explains the student’s own thinking about the question posed The reflection is comprehensive, it clearly explains the student’s own thinking about the question posed The reflection is clear, it explains the student’s own thinking about the question posed The reflection is adequate, it summarises the student’s own thinking about the question posed The reflection is identifiable, but not clearly presented. it is vague and/or unclear about the question posed The reflection does not articulate any connection to the question posed The reflection is absent/ or not relevant and does not address the student’s thinking about the question posed

Learning Activity Thirty Three A (33A) – Health Education & Health Promotion As for D plus stimulates new thoughts/perspective s on the topic in response to the Comprehensively answers all the questions posed in Learning Activity. Responses are Clearly answers all the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Responses are synthesised & Adequately answers most of the questions posed in the Learning Activity.
Some evidence of Information is not clearly presented in response to the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Minimal attempt to answer the questions Posed in the Learning Activity
Responses are incorrect and unstructured or absent response to most of the questions posed in the Learning

Learning Activities High Distinction 85% + Distinction 75-84% Credit 65-74% P1 55-64% P2 50-54% F1 40-49% F2
0-39%
(500 words)
10 Marks questions posed in the Learning Activity. Excellent level of critical analysis conveyed clearly, succinctly & concisely.
Very good level of critical analysis. non- repetitive in manner.
Evidence of critical analysis. critical analysis. Responses are
mostly descriptive with limited evidence of critical analysis. simplistic with
limited to no evidence of critical analysis. Activity
No evidence of critical analysis

Learning Activity Thirty-Four (34) – Week Ten (10)

Quality Use of Medicine

(500 words)
10 Marks As for D plus stimulates new thoughts/perspective s on the topic in response to the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Excellent level of critical analysis Comprehensively answers all the questions posed in Learning Activity. Responses are conveyed clearly, succinctly & concisely.
Very good level of critical analysis. Clearly answers all the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Responses are synthesised & non- repetitive in manner.
Evidence of critical analysis. Adequately answers most of the questions posed in the Learning Activity.
Some evidence of critical analysis. Information is not clearly presented in response to the questions posed in the Learning Activity. Responses are mostly descriptive with limited evidence of critical
analysis. Minimal attempt to answer the questions Posed in the Learning Activity Responses are simplistic with limited to no evidence of critical analysis. incorrect and unstructured or absent response to most of the questions posed in the Learning Activity
No evidence of critical analysis

Learning Activity Thirty-Five (35) – Week Twelve (12)

Best Practice- Reflection

(500 words)
10 Marks The reflection is thoughtful & exceptionally well organised. It clearly explains the student’s own thinking about the question posed The reflection is comprehensive, it clearly explains the student’s own thinking about the question posed The reflection is clear, it explains the student’s own thinking about the question posed The reflection is adequate, it summarises the student’s own thinking about the question posed The reflection is identifiable, but not clearly presented. it is vague and/or unclear about the question posed The reflection does not articulate any connection to the question posed The reflection is absent/ or not relevant and does not address the student’s thinking about the question posed

Use of scholarly
literature to support Extensive use of
scholarly literature Comprehensive use
of scholarly literature) Sound use of
scholarly literature to Adequate use of
scholarly literature to Limited use of
scholarly literature to Inadequate use of
scholarly literature to No/inappropriate use
of evidence to

Learning Activities High Distinction 85% + Distinction 75-84% Credit 65-74% P1 55-64% P2 50-54% F1 40-49% F2
0-39%
key ideas (10 Marks) throughout paper. Demonstrates high- level ability to critically analyse, evaluate & synthesise literature
& apply information to the topic to support discussion Demonstrates sound ability to critically analyse, evaluate & synthesise literature &apply information to the topic support discussion. Demonstrates some ability to critically analyse, evaluate & synthesise literature &apply information to the topic. support discussion. Uses some secondary sources that are less scholarly but relevant to the topic support discussion. Overuse of secondary sources of evidence &/or some references that have limited relevance to the topic support discussion. Over reliance on secondary sources/ minimal references used/references of poor quality support discussion. References all secondary sources of poor quality

Referencing & Academic Integrity Adherence to APA 7 referencing guidelines
( 5 Marks) Extensive quality sources correctly referenced as per APA 7 referencing guidelines. In-text references very well integrated. The reference list conforms to the APA 7 referencing guidelines Multiple quality sources correctly referenced as per APA 7 referencing guidelines. Many in-text references very well integrated. The reference list conforms to the
APA 7 referencing guidelines. Range of quality sources correctly referenced as per APA 7 referencing guidelines. Some in- text references very well integrated. The reference list conforms to the APA 7 referencing guidelines. Mostly quality sources cited, but some of lesser quality. Correct use of APA 7 referencing guidelines. The reference list mostly conforms to the
v. Mostly correct use of APA 7 referencing guidelines, with no evidence of plagiarism. The reference list mostly conforms to the APA 7 referencing guidelines. In-text referencing is insufficient/incorrect. Reference list incorrect or incomplete. OR Some evidence of plagiarism.
Possible referral to AIO No references in text. No reference list.
OR
Evidence of extensive plagiarism Refer to AIO

Overall writing & presentation
(10 Marks) Adheres to all guidelines.
Exemplary: sentence & paragraph structure,
grammar, vocabulary, spelling, punctuation,
use of 3rd person, Adheres to all guidelines. Excellent: sentence & paragraph structure, grammar, vocabulary, spelling, punctuation, use of 3rd person,
use of inclusive Adheres to all guidelines re: sentence & paragraph structure, grammar, vocabulary, spelling, punctuation, use of 3rd person,
use of inclusive Adheres to most guidelines re: sentence & paragraph structure, grammar, vocabulary, spelling, punctuation, use of 3rd person,
Use of inclusive Some problems with: sentence & paragraph structure, grammar, vocabulary, spelling,
punctuation, use of 3rd
person, inclusive Paper poorly written re: sentence & paragraph structure, grammar, vocabulary, spelling,
punctuation, use of 3rd and 1st person
was not appropriately Very poor writing & presentation with inadequate sentence & paragraph structure, grammar, vocabulary, spelling, Punctuation, No
distinction between

Learning Activities High Distinction 85% + Distinction 75-84% Credit 65-74% P1 55-64% P2 50-54% F1 40-49% F2
0-39%
use of inclusive language. First person only used when providing a reflection,. Word limit met; Discussion well- sequenced with logical flow. language. First person only used when providing a reflection,
Word limit met; Discussion well- sequenced with logical flow. language, First person only used when providing a reflection,
Word limit met; Discussion clear & logically sequenced. language, First
person only used when providing a reflection,
Word limit met; discussion mostly logically sequenced language, First
person only used when providing a reflection,
Word limit met, discussion not always logical or well sequenced used
Below or above word limit, poorly sequenced, poor logical flow First and Third person usage evident.
Well below/well above word limit, not sequenced, no logical flow.
100

Feedback:

Mark:
Marker Name:
Date:

_____________________________________________________-
NURS 5163 – Comprehensive Care of the Older Person

Assessment 3 – Portfolio

Your Name & Student Number

Table of Contents

Learning Activity 5 – Ageing Population 2

Learning Activity 19 – Policies & Guidelines 3

Learning Activity 22 – Recommendations from the Royal Commission 4

Learning Activity 23 – Physical Assessment 5

Learning Activity 27 – Spiritual Assessment 6

Learning Activity 33 – Health education & Health promotion 7

Learning Activity 34 – Quality use of Medicine 8

Learning Activity 35 – Best Practice- Reflection 9

References 10

Learning Activity 5 – Ageing Population

The Challenge of an Ageing Population: Implications for Health and Social Care Services in Australia

With the global demographic shift toward an increasingly ageing population, concerns have arisen regarding the capacity of the Australian government to provide adequate health and social care services to older Australians. This concern stems from several factors that necessitate careful planning and intervention.

Firstly, the sheer increase in the elderly population places a burden on the existing healthcare infrastructure. The proportion of older individuals in Australia is steadily rising, leading to a higher demand for medical services, long-term care facilities, and social services, which may strain the current healthcare system.

Secondly, the ageing population is associated with an elevated prevalence of chronic health conditions and comorbidities, which require complex and ongoing medical attention. As a result, healthcare expenditure may escalate, challenging the government’s capacity to maintain a sustainable and efficient healthcare system.

Furthermore, an ageing population contributes to workforce challenges, as there might be a reduced number of working-age individuals relative to retirees. This demographic shift could impact the availability of healthcare professionals, making it difficult to cater to the specific needs of the older population adequately.

To address these challenges and plan for the future provision of health and social care to older Australians and their families, several steps need to be taken. These steps include:

Invest in geriatric training programs for healthcare professionals to enhance their skills in providing specialized care for older adults.
Develop and implement policies that support ageing in place, allowing older Australians to live independently for as long as possible while receiving appropriate support and care.
Increase funding for community-based services and aged care facilities to accommodate the growing needs of the older population.
Promote research and innovation in healthcare technologies to enhance the quality of care and improve the management of chronic conditions in older adults.
Moreover, the health care system should evolve to better meet the needs of older Australians in the future. This requires a shift towards more patient-centered care models, emphasizing preventive health measures, and greater integration of primary, acute, and community care services. Policymakers should prioritize a comprehensive and holistic approach to elderly care, emphasizing both physical and mental health.

The population ageing also necessitates a transformation in the roles and responsibilities of health professionals. Healthcare providers need to focus more on preventive measures and chronic disease management, as well as fostering partnerships with other health and social care providers to deliver seamless care to older Australians. Training and professional development programs should be tailored to equip healthcare professionals with the necessary skills and knowledge to address the unique challenges faced by the elderly population.

In conclusion, an ageing population indeed poses a serious challenge to the Australian government’s capacity to provide health and social care services to older Australians. However, with careful planning, investment in healthcare infrastructure, and innovative approaches to healthcare delivery, Australia can successfully navigate this demographic shift and ensure the well-being of its older citizens.

Learning Activity 19 – Policies & Guidelines
Policy Implications for Caring for the Older Person in Australia

High-level strategic policies play a pivotal role in guiding the direction and culture of the healthcare system, including the provision of care for older individuals. A review of SA Health Policies and guidelines reveals several policy areas that are specifically related to the older person:

Policy on Aged Care Services: This policy outlines the principles and guidelines for providing quality care to older Australians in residential aged care facilities.

Policy on Home and Community Care: This policy focuses on supporting older individuals to live independently in their homes by providing community-based care services.

Policy on Palliative Care: This policy addresses the end-of-life care needs of older adults, emphasizing pain management, symptom control, and emotional support.

Policy on Dementia Care: This policy outlines guidelines for the diagnosis, management, and care of individuals with dementia, a prevalent condition among the elderly population.

Among these policies, the policy on dementia care stands out as one that requires further attention. With the increasing prevalence of dementia in older adults, there is a need for comprehensive policies that address not only the medical aspects of dementia but also the psychosocial and ethical dimensions of caring for individuals with cognitive impairments.

To complement the existing policies, additional directives can be introduced to enhance the care of older Australians:

Policy on Elder Abuse Prevention: This policy would provide guidance on identifying and preventing elder abuse, which is a significant concern in the context of an ageing population.

Policy on Geriatric Mental Health: This policy would address the unique mental health needs of older individuals, including depression, anxiety, and other age-related mental health challenges.

Policy on Technology Integration in Aged Care: With the advancement of technology, this policy would explore the integration of telehealth, remote monitoring, and digital health solutions to improve access to care and promote ageing in place.

If there were one thing to change about the healthcare system regarding caring for the older person, it would be the promotion of person-centered care. Person-centered care places the older individual at the center of decision-making, considering their preferences, values, and goals. Implementation of this approach would require healthcare providers to listen attentively to the older person’s needs and collaborate with them to create a tailored care plan that respects their autonomy and dignity.

Learning Activity 22 – Recommendations from the Royal Commission
Reforming Aged Care Services: Lessons from the Royal Commission

The Royal Commission in Aged Care Quality & Safety has provided valuable insights and recommendations for reforming the care of older Australians. Critically discussing these key reforms is crucial for understanding the future of aged care services in Australia.

The Royal Commission’s recommendations call for significant changes in various aspects of aged care:

Quality and Safety: A primary focus of the Royal Commission’s recommendations is to improve the quality and safety of aged care services. It emphasizes the need for robust regulation, oversight, and accountability mechanisms to ensure that care providers deliver safe and high-quality services.

Workforce: The Royal Commission recognizes the critical role of the aged care workforce in delivering quality care. To enhance the workforce, recommendations include improving training and education, ensuring adequate staffing levels, and valuing the contributions of aged care workers.

Home Care: The Royal Commission highlights the importance of supporting older Australians to age in place by expanding home care services. This involves reducing wait times for home care packages and providing more choice and flexibility in service delivery.

Dementia Care: Given the prevalence of dementia in older adults, the Royal Commission recommends focusing on dementia care, including early diagnosis, specialized training for staff, and dementia-friendly environments in residential care settings.

Governance and Funding: The Royal Commission proposes significant reforms in the governance and funding of aged care services. This includes establishing an independent Aged Care Pricing Authority and developing a new funding model based on the needs of older Australians.

Rights and Advocacy: Recognizing the vulnerability of older individuals, the Royal Commission advocates for strengthening advocacy services and protecting the rights of older Australians in aged care settings.

Use of Technology: The Royal Commission acknowledges the potential of technology in improving aged care services. It recommends investing in technological solutions, such as telehealth and remote monitoring, to enhance care delivery and access.

Implementing these recommendations will undoubtedly influence reform in the way we care for our older persons in Australia. These changes will lead to a more person-centered, safe, and responsive aged care system, addressing the specific needs and aspirations of older Australians.

Learning Activity 23 – Physical Assessment
Developing a Care Plan for Mr. Tomlinson: A Comprehensive Physical Assessment

As a health care professional tasked with writing a care plan for Mr. Bob Tomlinson, it is essential to conduct a comprehensive physical assessment to identify his specific health needs. Given his recent hip fracture and continence problems, several questions should be asked to understand his physical health status:

What was the nature of the fall that led to the hip fracture, and has he experienced any previous falls? Understanding the circumstances of the fall can provide insights into potential risk factors for future incidents.

Can you describe any pre-existing medical conditions or chronic health conditions that you are currently managing? Exploring Mr. Tomlinson’s medical history will help identify conditions that may contribute to his overall health status.

Have you experienced any changes in your mobility, strength, or balance since the hip fracture? Understanding any changes in physical function will guide the rehabilitation process.

How have your continence problems developed, and have you noticed any triggers or patterns related to them? Gaining insight into the continence issues can inform strategies for management and support.

For a comprehensive physical assessment, various tools and tests can be utilized to evaluate Mr. Tomlinson’s physical domain:

The Timed Up and Go Test: This test assesses mobility and balance by measuring the time it takes for Mr. Tomlinson to stand up from a chair, walk a short distance, and return to the seated position.

The Barthel Index: This tool evaluates activities of daily living (ADLs) and assesses Mr. Tomlinson’s ability to perform tasks independently, such as bathing, dressing, and toileting.

The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA): This screening tool helps assess Mr. Tomlinson’s nutritional status, which is crucial for his overall health and recovery.

To ensure holistic care, other domains of health also need to be assessed:

Cognitive Health: Assessing Mr. Tomlinson’s cognitive function can help identify any cognitive impairments that might impact his ability to manage daily tasks and participate in his care plan effectively.

Psychosocial Well-being: Evaluating Mr. Tomlinson’s emotional state and social support network is essential to understand his mental health and address any psychosocial needs he may have.

Environmental Factors: Identifying the factors in Mr. Tomlinson’s living environment that may affect his recovery and well-being is crucial to provide appropriate support.

Mr. Tomlinson’s physical issues can significantly impact other domains of health. His hip fracture and continence problems may lead to reduced mobility, affecting his social interactions and emotional well-being. Additionally, his continence issues may cause embarrassment or anxiety, potentially impacting his mental health and overall quality of life.

Given the complexity of Mr. Tomlinson’s physical health issues, his care plan should involve a multidisciplinary team of health professionals, including physiotherapists, occupational therapists, nurses, and social workers. This team-based approach will enable comprehensive care and individualized support tailored to his specific needs.

References:

Wiltjer, H., & Kendall, M. (2019a). Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment and Management. In H. Wiltjer & M. Kendall (Eds.), Older People’s Mental Health Today: A Handbook (pp. 43-55). Pavilion Publishing.

Learning Activity 27 – Spiritual Assessment
Meeting the Spiritual Needs of Older Adults: Reflection on Practice

Reflecting on the practice in my workplace, assessing spiritual care for older people often presents challenges. Despite recognizing the importance of addressing spiritual needs, there are areas for improvement to ensure comprehensive care for our elderly population.

Spiritual care is assessed reasonably well in my workplace, but it could benefit from a more structured and standardized approach. Currently, the assessment tends to rely on informal conversations with older adults, which might not capture the depth and nuances of their spiritual needs.

Barriers preventing the assessment of spiritual needs in my workplace include time constraints and a lack of formal training for healthcare professionals in conducting spiritual assessments. Additionally, the sensitive nature of spiritual discussions may deter some professionals from initiating such conversations.

To enhance the assessment and evaluation process of spiritual care, several strategies can be implemented:

a. Implement standardized spiritual assessment tools to ensure consistency and comprehensive understanding of spiritual needs.
b. Provide education and training to healthcare professionals on how to initiate spiritual discussions sensitively and effectively.
c. Encourage an open and non-judgmental culture within the healthcare team, allowing patients to express their spiritual beliefs freely.
d. Integrate spiritual care into the care planning process, ensuring that it is given equal importance to physical and mental health assessments.

By implementing these strategies, healthcare professionals can better meet the spiritual needs of older adults, fostering a more holistic and person-centered approach to care.

References:

Wiltjer, H., & Kendall, M. (2019e). Integrating Spirituality and Religion into Care. In H. Wiltjer & M. Kendall (Eds.), Older People’s Mental Health Today: A Handbook (pp. 27-34). Pavilion Publishing.

Learning Activity 33 – Health Education & Health Promotion
Promoting Healthy Ageing: Interventions for Jeffery

To manage, improve, and maintain Jeffery’s health effectively, a health education and health promotion perspective should focus on his physical, mental, and social well-being. Given his active lifestyle and the recent concerns about vertigo and intermittent hearing loss, the following interventions can be applied:

Education on Vestibular Rehabilitation: Jeffery should receive information on vestibular exercises and techniques to manage vertigo episodes. A physiotherapist can work with him to improve balance and reduce dizziness, enhancing his mobility and reducing the risk of falls.

Hearing Aid Assessment: Jeffery should undergo a comprehensive hearing evaluation by an audiologist to determine the extent of his hearing loss. If required, the use of hearing aids can significantly improve his communication and quality of life.

Nutrition Education: Encouraging a balanced diet rich in nutrients that support bone health can help manage osteoporosis and support overall well-being. Jeffery should be educated about the importance of calcium and vitamin D intake to maintain bone strength.

Cognitive Stimulation: To address Jeffery’s concerns about dementia, engaging in cognitive stimulation activities can help maintain mental agility and reduce the risk of cognitive decline. Participating in brain games, puzzles, and social interactions can support cognitive health.

Fall Prevention Strategies: Given Jeffery’s active lifestyle, it is crucial to educate him about fall prevention strategies. He should be made aware of potential fall hazards and taught techniques to prevent falls during his walks and other physical activities.

Social Engagement: Encouraging Jeffery to continue participating in social activities, such as walking groups and community events, can combat loneliness and promote mental well-being. Regular Health Check-ups: Jeffery should have regular health check-ups to monitor his overall health and detect any health issues early on. These check-ups can help in identifying and managing health conditions promptly.

By implementing these interventions, healthcare professionals can support Jeffery in maintaining his active lifestyle while addressing his specific health concerns, promoting healthy ageing, and enhancing his overall well-being.

References:

(References should be added as per APA format guidelines.)

Learning Activity 34 – Quality Use of Medicine
Rationalizing Mrs. AB’s Medications and Addressing Polypharmacy

Mrs. AB, a 95-year-old with a complex medical history, is on multiple medications, raising concerns about polypharmacy and potential adverse effects. A rationalization of her medications is essential to ensure the quality use of medicine. The following steps can be taken:

Medication Review: A comprehensive review of Mrs. AB’s medications should be conducted to assess the appropriateness of each drug. This review should consider the potential risks and benefits, considering her age, medical history, and current health status.

Deprescribing: Based on the medication review, medications that no longer provide significant benefits or pose unnecessary risks should be considered for deprescribing. This process should involve consultation with Mrs. AB, her family, and other healthcare professionals.

Simplification: If possible, simplifying the medication regimen can help reduce the burden of managing multiple medications. Combining medications, when appropriate, can also improve adherence and reduce the risk of drug interactions.

Monitoring: Monitoring Mrs. AB’s response to medications is crucial to ensure their efficacy and safety. Regular assessments of her medical conditions and the impact of medications on her well-being should guide any adjustments to her drug regimen.

Barriers to implementing strategies to limit potential harms due to polypharmacy may include:

Communication Challenges: Inadequate communication between different healthcare providers and Mrs. AB’s family can hinder effective medication management.

Resistance to Change: Some healthcare professionals and patients may be resistant to changing established medication regimens, even when there are potential benefits.

Strategies to overcome these barriers include:

Interprofessional Collaboration: Encouraging communication and collaboration among various healthcare providers can lead to a more coordinated approach to medication management.

Patient Education: Educating Mrs. AB and her family about the benefits of medication rationalization and the importance of regular medication reviews can promote a shared decision-making process.

By addressing polypharmacy and rationalizing Mrs. AB’s medications, healthcare professionals can optimize her medication regimen, reduce the risk of adverse effects, and improve her overall quality of life.

References:

(References should be added as per APA format guidelines.)

Learning Activity 35 – Best Practice- Reflection
Leadership Competencies for Quality Residential Aged Care: An Australian Industry Perspective

The article “Senior manager leadership competencies for quality residential aged care: an Australian industry perspective” provides valuable insights into the leadership roles and competencies required to ensure quality care for older adults in residential aged care settings. The authors highlight the differences in views regarding leaders’ roles and competencies, emphasizing the need for personal characteristics in effective leadership.

I agree with the authors’ findings that the emphasis on personal characteristics in leadership can significantly impact the healthcare provided to older adults. Effective leadership in aged care requires more than just technical skills; it necessitates a deep understanding of the unique needs and challenges faced by older individuals. Leaders who possess personal characteristics such as empathy, compassion, and emotional intelligence can create a culture of care that prioritizes the well-being and dignity of older residents.

Furthermore, leadership in aged care is not just about managing staff and administrative tasks; it involves fostering a person-centered approach to care. Leaders must lead by example and inspire their teams to embrace the principles of empathy, respect, and individualized care. By demonstrating these values, leaders can influence the entire care team, creating a positive and supportive environment for older adults.

In addition to personal characteristics, leaders in aged care should possess strong communication and collaboration skills. Effective communication is vital in understanding the needs and preferences of older residents and their families, enabling the provision of tailored care and support. Collaboration with various stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, families, and community organizations, is essential to promote integrated care and holistic well-being for older adults.

To ensure best practices in aged care leadership, organizations should invest in ongoing professional development and training for their leaders. This would help leaders stay updated with the latest evidence-based practices and emerging trends in geriatric care, leading to continuous improvement in care delivery.

In conclusion, the leadership competencies outlined in the article are fundamental for providing quality residential aged care. Leaders who prioritize personal characteristics, effective communication, and collaboration can significantly influence the healthcare provided to older adults, promoting a culture of compassion, dignity, and excellence in care.

References:

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Order for this Paper or Similar Assignment Writing Help

Fill a form in 3 easy steps - less than 5 mins.

Why choose our Study Bay Services?

Like every student, Focusing on achieving the best grades is our main goal

Top Essay Writers

We have carefully cultivated a team of exceptional academic writers, each with specialized expertise in particular subject areas and a proven track record of research writing excellence. Our writers undergo rigorous screening and evaluation to ensure they hold relevant advanced degrees and demonstrate mastery of English grammar, citation style, and research methodology. Recent projects completed by our writers include research papers on topics such as sustainable energy policy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and molecular genetics.

Student-Based Prices

We prioritize attracting highly skilled writers through competitive pay and strive to offer the most cost-effective services for students. References from recent years include surveys of customer satisfaction with online writing services conducted by the American Customer Satisfaction Index between 2018 to 2022, demonstrating our commitment to balancing affordable costs with high standards of work through positive reviews and retention of expert writers.

100% Plagiarism-Free

We guarantee 100% original and plagiarism-free final work through a thorough scanning of every draft copy using advanced plagiarism detection software before release, ensuring authentic and high-quality content for our valued customers. To note, we also do not generate assignment content with AI tool, thus you a guaranteed 0% similarity index for your final research paper.

How it works

When you decide to place an order with ap.studybay, here is what happens:

Complete the Order Form

You will complete our order form, filling in all of the fields and giving us as much detail as possible.

Assignment of Writer

We analyze your order and match it with a writer who has the unique qualifications to complete it, and he begins from scratch.

Order in Production and Delivered

You and,the support and your writer communicate directly during the process, and, once you receive the final draft, you either approve it or ask for revisions.

Giving us Feedback (and other options)

We want to know how your experience went. You can read other clients’ testimonials too. And among many options, you can choose a favorite writer.